Leopard desktop
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18 marzo
2008

Leopard desktop

and after an upgrade... the screenshot...
[OSX] 

That's the look of my laptop after the Tiger-to-Leopard upgrade:

Plain desktop, only a small set of icons and the dock hidden

I've customized the Terminal.app a little bit too (the most used app in the laptop, for sure!)

YES!, it is OSX!

Some new things in Leopard, the new spaces (something similar to the virtual desktops on most Unix-like system window managers):

OSX finally have native virtual desktops

That image above is the result of pressing F8 to see all the spaces at once. An interesting thing about spaces is that you can use expose on top of them, to get a whole view of your windows:

and you can use expose and spaces at the same time!

Of couse spaces are very simplistic if you compare it with the virtual desktops from enlightenment or some other window managers, but I hope they will work to get more advanced versions in a near future.

Another add-on from Leopard is the use of CoverFlow in the Finder. That effect was used before in iTunes, and now they have put it in the Finder itself, so you can use it to view the contents of any folder.

It will display previews of most filetypes, like contents of PDF files, a thumnail of an image, or the contents of a Python source code file:

Finder coverflow, well, not so useful, but pretty

There are some other new things inside this new version of macacosx (like Time Machine or Quicklook), you can check them all here.

Posted by wu at 19:11 | Comments (0) | Trackbacks (0)
<< From Tiger to Leopard in 10 steps | Main | man paths in OSX >>
Comments
Re: Leopard desktop

i've been using leopard everyday for the last months and although it's not so speedy on new graphichs stuff like coverflow in finder and stacks it's usable enough (ppc mac mini)
the only new thing i use it is spaces, that was really needed. i have the apps that i use more associated with a vr desktop so when they are opened it switches to right desktop. all i use after is just shortcuts for each desktop instead of alt-tab.
i would love to try time machine out but don't have an external hdd.

Posted by: w0lfshade at marzo 19,2008 09:41
Re: Leopard desktop

Well, you could use alt+tab, as it will send you to the desktop the application you are switching to is (I found that very convenient).
About Time Machine I haven't used it yet, I've an external disk, but right now inside it there is my old Tiger copy, and i'll not delete it until I can be completely sure everything works fine in Leopard.

Posted by: Wu at marzo 19,2008 11:10
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